Four Corners Winners: Landscape

On Monday my fellow judge Sam Larner and I met to choose the winners for my Four Corners Travel Photography Competition, which I ran this month in association with Zinio. It’s a total competition cliché, but I can honestly say that choosing just two winners in each of the four categories was a horrendously difficult decision! There were so many fantastic entries, I was genuinely blown away by what a talented lot my readers are!

Last – but certainly not least – are the winners from the Landscape category. With so many stunning entries, this was certainly my favourite category and yet another tricky decision! The two winners we chose, Dave Carter and Nick Board, both submitted entries which we felt had a bit of a new twist on the traditional landscape shot.

The Lost World, Venezuela

The Lost World, Venezuela

By Dave Carter

“I’ve recently started as a Freelance Photographer after a 20 year career in IT. I love Adventure Travel and Photography – the two go together perfectly.”

www.davecarterphotography.com and www.davesphotoblog.net

Judges Comments (Sam): It has great depth and has created a strong sense of atmosphere and cleverly through a tight crop has still given the viewer a good understanding of the sheer scale of the landscape.

Narrows

Narrows

By Nick Board

“The Narrows, the Virgin river cuts through the canyon in Zion National Park, Utah. People armed with stout staffs, and waterproof boots, hike the river.

“My name is Nick Board, I’m 57 years old and a Chef by trade. Sometimes however I like to down my knives, and get out and about with my camera. Winning a few photo competitions down the years, has given me the opportunity to explore places i never would have had the chance to see. Trips to the South of France,Thailand,Singapore and last year a Western USA tour.”
Judges Comments (Emily): I love the mix of textures in this shot, with the softness of the water, the glossy pebbles in the foreground and the sharp lines of the rocks. The inclusion of the two small figures in the background adds a sense of the scale and grandeur of the setting, but the long exposure means that the shadowy blur of the figures doesn’t distract from the landscape in anyway.

PS – the featured image was chosen at random and is not a reflection of preference in any way! 

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